Wrap Up-Works Cited

April 2, 2010 at 4:36 pm (Wrap Up and Work Cited)

This blog has helped shed some light on the responsibility Disney has played in contrasting gender stereotypes and ideals.  It’s important to note that Disney films did not create these ideals; they were already circulating in society and being depicted in other medias.  Disney took these stereotypes: muscular man, strong man, fighting man, feminine girl, domestic girl, docile girl and virgin girl to educate young society on how to behave.  They prepared children for the road ahead and informed them, that if they acted the way the heroes and heroines acted, they might too get a Prince of Princess of their own.

Disney used different techniques to exaggerate these gender stereotypes.  Mirrors were used to emphasize society’s view on gender stereotypes.  Different characters were used to show how to act and how not to act.  Suttle clues where used to suggest whether or not a character was really part of dominant culture. For instance, count the number or times Gaston has a phallic object in his hand (mirror, knife, rock) – these objects emphasize that Gaston is lacking something.

Disney has kept this formula simple.  Only using a hero, heroine and villain to tell its fairy tale.  All other characters are depicted as a-sexual, old, weak or as inanimate objects.  This helps children to distinguish what category they can be a part of  – they can really only be a hero or heroine.  Lastly, the stereotyping Disney continues to do, allows poets and critics to fight back – Anne Sexton writes her poem Snow White to emphasize the gender stereotypes that occurs in these films and bring light to the problems they bring.  Instead of educating children by informing them of their respective gender roles, Disney should maybe consider opening its horizons and showing a little more diversity.

Well that’s the End of my Blog… and it lived happily ever after, showing the gender roles society values.

________________________________________________________

Works Cited:

  • Bell, Elizabeth.  “Somatexts at the Disney Shop: Constructing the Pentimentos of Women’s Animation Body. From Mouse to Mermaid: The Politics of Film, Gender and Culture.  Ed. Elizabeth Bell, Linda Haas and Laura Sells. Indiana: Indiana University Press, 1995. 107–  124. Print.
  • Brazillia, Shuli. “Reading ‘Snow White’: The Mother’s Story.” Signs 15.3 (1990):515 -534.
  • Erb, Cynthia. “Another World or the World of an Other? The Space of Romance in Recent Versions of Beauty and the Beast.” Cinema Journal, 34:4. 1995. 50-70.
  • Jeffords, Susan.  “The Curse of Masculinity: Disney’s Beauty and the Beast.” From Mouse to Mermaid: The Politics of Film, Gender and Culture.  Ed. Elizabeth Bell, Linda Haas and Laura Sells. Indiana: Indiana University Press, 1995. 161 – 172. Print.
  • Lieberman, Marcia R. ‘Some Day My Prince Will Come’: Female Acculturation through the Fairy Tale.” College English 34.3 (1972): 383-395.
  • Murphy, Patrick D. “The Whole Wide World Was Scrubbed Clean: The     Andocentric Animation of Denatured Disney.” From Mouse to Mermaid: The Politics of Film, Gender and Culture.  Ed. Elizabeth  Bell, Linda Haas and Laura Sells. Indiana: Indiana University Press, 1995. 125 – 136. Print.
  • Solis, Santiago. “Snow White and the Seven ‘Dwarfs’: Queercripped.” Hypatia 22.1 (2007): 114-131.
  • Stone, Kay. “Things Walt Disney Never Told Us.” Journal of American Folklore 88(1975): 42 -50.
  • Zipes, Jack.  “Breaking the Disney Spell.” From Mouse to Mermaid: The    Politics of Film, Gender and Culture.  Ed. Elizabeth Bell, Linda Haas  and Laura Sells. Indiana: Indiana University Press, 1995.  21-42. Print
  • Sexton, Anne.  Snow White and the Seven Dwarves. web http://www.poets.org/viewmedia.php/prmMID/15300
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